Charitable giving often plays a role in the estate planning process. The reasons to include it may comprise one or more benefits. For example, you may want to take advantage of tax benefits or the possibility of creating a legacy. Sometimes income- and estate-tax consequences are at the top of the list, and sometimes they are not. Regardless of the motivation, you should be aware of how different charitable giving strategies might impact your overall plan.

In this section, we will explore a few of the more common charitable giving strategies. They include:

  • Outright gifts of cash or appreciated securities
  • Bequests in your will or trust
  • Naming charitable beneficiaries on retirement assets or life insurance policies
  • Donor-advised fund
  • Charitable remainder trust
  • Pooled income fund
  • Charitable gift annuity
  • Charitable lead trust

We encourage you to discuss these strategies and others with your tax and legal advisors to evaluate whether they are a good fit for your tax situation and your charitable giving goals.

Outright gifts of cash or appreciated securities >

Bequests in your will or trust >

Naming charitable beneficiaries >

Donor-advised fund >

Charitable remainder trust >

Pooled income fund >

Charitable gift annuity >

Charitable lead trust >